English language cues

English language cues

English language cues

Reaching English language learners

Teachers must differentiate tasks, taking into consideration what educational philosopher John Dewey suggested long ago: that we begin where the students are, not where we would like them to be.

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Related pages

  • Teach what you love: Stephen Mullaney works as a half-time ESL resource teacher/half-time second grade language arts teacher at Club Boulevard Elementary in Durham. This article focuses on his advice for teachers working with ESL students.
  • Writing and English as a Second Language: Strategies for helping English Language Learners throughout the writing process.
  • Making reading passages comprehensible for English language learners: English language learners can read the same content-area material as their peers, but they may need special help. Teachers can make difficult reading comprehensible by building vocabulary, decoding difficult syntax, and teaching background knowledge.

Related topics

  • Learn more about English language learners, cognition, differentiated instruction, diverse learners, engaging students, inclusion, and teaching methods.

Source: http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/760



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7 Hidden "Body Language Clues" That She Likes You

Nonverbal Dictionary

AZ

Each entry in the Nonverbal Dictionary has been researched by anthropologists, archaeologists, biologists, linguists, psychiatrists, psychologists, semioticians, and others who have studied human communication from a scientific point of view.

You can access this outstanding online resource for free via the following link.

About The Author

(Photo Credit: Doreen K. Givens)

Dr. Givens began studying body language for his Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of Washington in Seattle. He served as Anthropologist in Residence at the American Anthropological Association in Washington, D.C. from 1985-97. He taught anthropology at the University of Washington and currently teaches in the School of Professional Studies at Gonzaga University. His expertise is in nonverbal communication, anthropology, and the brain.

Givens offers seminars to lawyers, judges, social workers, salespeople, and physicians, works with local law-enforcement agencies and the FBI, and consults with the U.S. intelligence community. Givens and neuroscientist Paul D. MacLean introduced the word "isopraxism" (the reptilian principle of mimicking) into the English language, as announced by the executive editor of the American Heritage Dictionary in the Atlantic Monthly.

His ideas on nonverbal communication have been written about in Omni, Harpers, the New Yorker, U.S. News & World Report and in the New York Times, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times.

About The Center

The Center for Nonverbal Studies (CNS) is a private, nonprofit research center located in Spokane, Washington. Underway since October 1, 1997, the Center's mission is to advance the study of human communication in all its forms apart from language. The Center's goal is to promote the scientific study of nonverbal communication , which includes body movement, gesture, facial expression, adornment and fashion, architecture, mass media, and consumer-product design.

Source: http://www.all-about-body-language.com/nonverbal-dictionary.html



More information about English language cues

Backchannel Facts

What is a Backchannel?

H Is it like a party, like, ``rave'' type party? or like
Cwell, it's someone's house
H yeah
Cthere's going to be, I mean there's like, they're going to be spinning. So, in that sense, maybe, but it's just at someone's house, like
H yah-yeah
Cit's in the middle of the night, that too, but.

Why do People Backchannel?

What are the Most Common Backchannels?

Here are five of the most typical backchannels in a few languages.

American
English [5]
Mexican
Spanish
Japanese [5] Iraqi
Arabic
French [10] German [1]
1 yeah si un aih oui ah (ach)
2 uh-huh si si ee nam ouais ja (ahja, aja)
3 hm ajá aa repetitionhumhum mhm
4 right mjm laughter mmmhum nein (ne)
5 okay laughter hai hmm ah okay

Why Aren't These Words in Dictionaries?

Does Backchannel Behavior Differ Among Languages?

When Should One Backchannel?

Obviously one can backchannel when the other person has the floor, but backchanneling just anytime can be rude. Listeners should in general give backchannel feedback at times when the other person seems to be welcoming it, and in many cases these times are marked by prosodic features of the speaker's utterances: these in effect are cues for feedback, although responding is generally optional.

Why are Backchannels Important?

Where Can I Hear Audio Clips with Backchannels?

How Can I Teach Students to Backchannel Properly?

It can be helpful for learners to listen repeatedly to dialogs and observe the patterns of backchanneling. This requires actual unrehearsed dialogs, not acted conversations, since they typically follow different rules.

Why Did You Make this Page?

References

[10] Analysis of 15 French Dialogs Containing 950 Back-Channels. David Novick, Jean-Baptiste Martel, Jean-Baptiste Wolff, Nigel Ward, May 2011.

Nigel Ward's Home Page February, 2007, updated October 2016

Source: http://www.cs.utep.edu/nigel/bc/



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