Nissan Beetle price

Nissan Beetle price

Nissan beetle price

After a brief hiatus, the New Beetle returns for 2012 as just the 2012 Volkswagen Beetle. The new Beetle sports a more aggressive, masculine design more true to the original people’s car than the New Beetle. With its Porsche 911-esque profile, the 2012 VW Beetle is longer, lower, and wider than the outgoing model while still remaining a compact coupe.

At its debut, the 2012 Beetle will have two models, two engine options and four engine options. The base engine in the Beetle 2.5 is a 2.5-liter I-5 producing 170 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque. The standard transmission is a five-speed manual, while a six-speed automatic is available. The base engine in the Beetle Turbo is the same 2.0-liter turbocharged I-4 found in the Volkswagen GTI. The turbocharged I-4 produces 200-hp and 207 lb-ft of torque in the Beetle Turbo. A six-speed manual transmission is standard on the Beetle Turbo, and a six-speed dual-clutch automatic complete with paddle shifters is optional. A 2.0-liter turbodiesel is slated to join the lineup in late 2012.

The 2012 Beetle’s interior gets redone for 2012 too. The 2012 Beetle loses its flower-power vase, and instead features a retro-inspired cockpit that includes a painted dashboard, an extra glove box (dubbed the “Beetle Bin”), and optional center console-mounted auxiliary instruments including an oil temperature gauge, clock, and boost gauge, on turbo models.

Everything is new on the 2012 Volkswagen Beetle. The all-new Beetle features a more aggressive look that’s designed to appeal to women and men. Aside from the new exterior and interior, the new 2012 Volkswagen Beetle gets new fuel efficient engines and transmissions. Later this year a 2.0-liter turbodiesel I-4 producing around 140 hp and 236 lb-ft of torque will make its way into the Beetle. We suspect a Beetle Convertible won’t be too far behind.

The Volkswagen Beetle’s exterior is all-new for 2012 becoming longer, lower, and wider. The new Beetle is 6.0 inches longer, 0.5 inches lower, and 3.3 inches wider than the old model, giving it improved ride and handling. In becoming lower, the 2012 Beetle loses the New Beetle’s arched “cathedral roof” giving it a look similar to that of the original Beetle, and a profile reminiscent of the Porsche 911. Volkswagen differentiates the exterior of the Beetle 2.5 and Beetle Turbo by giving the Beetle 2.5 retro-inspired 17-inch “turbine” wheels, and the Beetle Turbo 18-inch “twister” wheels, and a rear spoiler.

The interior of the 2012 Beetle is just as retro-inspired as the exterior, while still featuring the modern amenities one expects in a premium compact. The new 2012 Beetle comes standard with iPod connectivity, and features optional extras like navigation, a Fender-branded premium stereo, and a sunroof. The Beetle is also notably for its “Beetle Bin,” which is a second glove box above the conventional one, just like the original Beetle.

The 2012 Volkswagen Beetle sports significantly improved performance over the outgoing model. The enthusiast’s choice would have to be the Beetle Turbo, which is essentially a VW GTI in a costume. A Beetle Turbo equipped with the six-speed dual-clutch auto took 6.3 seconds to hit 60 mph from a standstill–just a tick slower than the GTI. The Beetle Turbo also managed a respectable 27 seconds at 0.65 g on the Motor Trend Figure Eight course. A six-speed automatic Beetle 2.5 took 8.8 seconds to hit 60 mph from a standstill. Both the Beetle 2.5 and the Beetle Turbo needed 125 feet to come to a dead stop from 60 mph.

The 2012 Volkswagen Beetle comes standard from the factory with driver and front passenger airbags, and side curtain airbags in the front, and rear. The Beetle also features Volkswagen’s Intelligent Crash Response System. VW’s Intelligent Crash Response System shuts off the Beetle’s fuel pump, unlocks the doors, and switches on the hazards in the event the Beetle is involved in an accident. Both the Beetle 2.5 and Beetle Turbo also come standard with traction control and electronic stability control.

  • Porsche 911 profile
  • Beetle Turbo performance
  • Retro interior touches
  • Being accused of driving a “girl’s” car
  • Dated 2.5-liter I-5

Legend reborn, again

  • Fiat 500
  • Ford Mustang
  • Honda Civic coupe
  • Hyundai Veloster
  • Mini Cooper
  • Scion tC

Source: http://www.motortrend.com/cars/volkswagen/beetle/2012/



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Best Price Used 2009 Volkswagen Beetle 2.5L Southern Maine Motors Saco Portland Bangor

But let us not be purists about our Beetles or 501s. (Levi’s, unlike Beetles, are not better today—trust us.) The material suggests denim clothing, at least, and the coloration and contrast stitching look handsome against the Stonewashed Blue paint of our test car. Like other Beetle convertible tops, this blue-jeansy one is a thick, triple-layer design with a glass window. It does a great job of insulating against noise and weather, folds with the touch of a button at speeds up to 31 mph, and doesn’t impose any severe visibility problems whether up or down. The Denim edition includes 17-inch aluminum wheels in the retro-looking Heritage Graphite design, a blue and silver dashpad, and manually adjustable sport seats that have denim-look centers, white stitching, and little red tags on the seat pockets emblazoned with Beetle logos. Visually, it’s handsome and somewhat more masculine than the ladybug dots and daisy decals that often emblazoned 1970s Beetles.

And, unlike most special-edition packages, this one is a genuine value proposition despite being produced in a “collectible” short run of only 2000 units, equally divided between this color and white. This car listed for ,815 without the single option offered from the factory: a 0 wind blocker that we’ve previously found to work well enough but happily lived without, given the fuss of installing it and having it block the back seat. That bottom line is only 5 higher than the lowliest of base Beetle convertibles, which is what the car is, aside from the Denim-package appearance items. If you want this look, however, you’ll not be able to get stand-alone options including navigation or HID headlights as you can in the non-Denim car. Still, the Denim is no old-school stripper with rubber mats, hand-crank windows, and manual locks. There’s standard air conditioning; heated, power-folding exterior mirrors; heated washer nozzles; heated seats; a nice leather-wrapped steering wheel with multifunction controls; and even reading lamps. The little whale-tail spoiler is standard on convertibles, mostly because the folded top looks better with it than without it.

Turbocharged, Whale-Tailed, but Not Fast

Getting to 60 mph in 7.6 seconds is more than sufficient for this car’s top-down cruising personality, and there’s plenty of poke for daily driving, with strong 30-to-50-mph acceleration for urban traffic. The transmission can be lazy about shifting, but Sport mode lets the driver take control when necessary. The independent rear suspension aids the ride over rough pavement. The Beetle Denim exhibited less chassis flex and cowl shake over railroad crossings and pockmarked asphalt than did the Mini convertibles we’ve driven recently, and the ride was comfortable.

Speaking of retro, there’s still a CD player in this Beetle, and VW also finally got around to putting a USB port beside the AUX input. So put the top down and find some way to convert your ’70s mix tape into a modern playlist. Don’t leave out Captain Beefheart (“Blue Jeans and Moonbeams”) and Neil Diamond (“Forever in Blue Jeans”), and have a great summer at the beach. We’ll be the ones bringing the picnic goods, though . . . we have a Golf.

Source: http://www.caranddriver.com/volkswagen/beetle



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While it’s not being called SE-R, it does remind us of the original, B13-generation Sentra SE-R from the early 1990s, which was essentially a workaday Sentra coupe with a 140-hp engine and a sprinkling of performance upgrades that earned it four straight years on our 10Best Cars list (1991–1994) and turned it into a sleeper performance car and something of a cult classic. We expect zero-to-60-mph times to drop from the mid-nines to about seven seconds flat, but we won’t know for sure until we strap our test equipment to it, of course.

As with the old SE-R models, the SR Turbo’s upgrades are subtle on the outside but thorough under the skin. Based on the SR trim level, the Turbo gets larger front brakes (11.7 inches versus 11.0), a reinforced cowl, front springs that are 10 percent stiffer, and damping that is firmer by 23 percent up front and 50 percent at the rear. The SR Turbo also benefits from revisions to the electrically assisted power steering that are designed to provide better feel on the highway, and both transmissions have been tweaked for SR Turbo duty.

The wheels are the same 17-inchers used by the non-turbo model. In addition to the SR standard equipment, the Turbo adds a sunroof. An SR Turbo Premium package adds leather, blind-spot warning, rear cross-traffic alert, and Bose premium audio.

Source: http://www.caranddriver.com/nissan/sentra



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